Why a Co-education Catholic School

Why a Co-educational Catholic School?


We offer a community environment that allows our children a unique opportunity to grow in knowledge and connect their faith to their daily lives.  They are able to live out the values upon which their education is based.

Pupils learn to question, to establish self-confidence, to show respect for others and to experience a sense of accomplishment stemming from individual achievement and responsibility. At Bishop Challoner we encourage every pupil to choose subjects best suited to their needs and aspirations that they will enjoy and are good at, allowing them to achieve and be successful.

Our co-educational environment does not compel any pupil to conform to traditional roles perceived to be stereotypical. Every pupil is treated as an equal and given a fair chance and through debating, Duke of Edinburgh's Award Scheme, drama, sport, music and charity work and leadership opportunities, they have every opportunity to excel.  They are able to develop naturally in an environment that mirrors that of the real world, mix with others and learn from each other intellectually as well as socially.

Some schools favouring single-sex schooling promote their schools based on academic performance and their positioning in the league tables, but one needs to examine how selective the intake is and the socio-economic nature of those attending these schools.  Our school is much more than gaining excellent academic success but about development of the whole individual, offering an educational foundation for life to the full, ensuring that each child develops spiritually, morally, socially, physically and emotionally. Their learning is enhanced in the classroom and the examination results at Bishop Challoner show no significant difference in gender with GCSE results.


They are able to relate well in the classroom and freely in lessons and do not feel held back but are able to build their thinking skills and confidence.   The learning styles of boys and girls are different but with excellent staff they should be able to tailor individual pupil needs to suit individual learning styles enabling them to feel challenged and engaged in lessons. The pupils are able to develop interpersonal and communicating skills, a spirit of co-operation and learn from their peers, all of which are essential to life beyond school, enabling them to cope with the demands of society in an interconnected world.

Professor Alan Smithers, Director of Education and Employment Research at the University of Buckingham indicated that Studies all over the world have failed to detect any major differences on educational grounds between single sex and coeducational schools.
 

P. Anderson